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A Rough Guide On How To Get An Apprenticeship

Kathryn Hamilton 04/02/20

Apprenticeships are an excellent option for people who know what career they want to go into and don't want to be taught via a classroom environment. They are perfect for having a hands-on approach while gaining experience and a wage. 

The basics of what an apprenticeship involves:

  • A tutor from your chosen apprenticeship company coming out to your place of work once a month.

  • You will be given time during work hours to complete any coursework and revise for your exams. (This should be allotted time where you will no be disrupted)

  • Some apprenticeships have a few weeks of classroom-based training spread out over your course. (I have 6 weeks over an 18 month period so not much at all)

  • The minimum length of an apprenticeship is 1 year with most being 15 to 18 months 

  • Most apprenticeships do have exams involved in them. Whether that be basic English and Maths to ICT or coding depending on your apprenticeship. 

 

Being able to self learn and stay organised will be a huge benefit when completing your apprenticeship.  You may be asked to complete a timesheet to log all your off the job learning hours and be able to show and explain evidence of work or how you have communicated externally with a customer or with colleagues. 

Top tips for finding an apprenticeship:

  • Use the gov.apprenticehip website (it's basically Rightmove but for apprenticeships) and apply for every apprenticeship that interests you. Apprenticeship aren't always the easiest thing to get into sometimes it is just luck, don't feel defeated if you are getting applications knocked back. 

  • Avoid apprenticeships that are only offering the minimum apprenticeship wage. The minimum wage for your age is reasonable as you are still learning but anything lower than that, I would personally say to avoid. 

  • Think about how far away you want to be working and the time it is going to take you to get there. Do you want to be getting up at 6 am and getting back at 7 pm every night? 

And remember it is still a job, this means you'll be likely working 9 am till 5 pm, five times a week, working and learning at the same time. Possibly having to wear smart work clothes and making sure that you are always on time, and grown up in your attitude towards working and completing tasks. If that sounds like something for you, then go ahead and start your apprenticeship journey. 

 

From one apprentice to (soon to be) another, best of luck!